Wednesday, 12 August 2009

Photos by Wonderlane and their stories

Here are some findings from Linda Lane's amazingly eclectic 'Wonderlane Photostream' on Flickr:

Relics of Jamyang Khyentse Chökyi Lodrö on display at the Guadalajara Expo, Mexico as part of the Maitreya Project Relic Tour

In 2005 Sogyal Rinpoche offered some precious relics of Jamyang Khyentse that he had inherited from his father Tsewang Paljor, to Lama Zopa Rinpoche. The Maitreya Project is an ambitious endeavor to erect a 500ft / 152m bronze statue of Buddha Maitreya at Kushinagar, Uttar Pradesh in northern India, large enough to accomodated temples, exhibition halls, a museum and a library. A collection of more than 1,000 Buddhist relics will be permanently housed in a shrine near its heart. Next to some important relics of the Buddha and his disciples, it will also contain remains of many masters connected in various ways with the life story of Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse.


photos by Linda Lane

In good company (from top left): Dudjom Rinpoche, HH the 16th Karmapa, Jamyang Khyentse Chökyi Lodrö, Jigme Phuntsok Rinpoche; (from bottom left) Gwang-Chin Master, relics that were discovered as a ter (hidden treasure), Jamgon Kongtrul Rinpoche, RigdzinTrinley

If you would like to know more about the role of relics in Buddhist practice you may want to read David Germano's Embodying the Dharma: Buddhist Relic Veneration in Asia available here.

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Also have a look at this great set of photos from 1976:

Dilgo Khyentse with Sakya Dagchen

In early 1954 a hundred lay people followed by a hundred monks left Dzongsar and went to receive Sakya Dagchen Rinpoche and his family; Khyentse Chökyi Lodrö, Dilgo Khyentse, Dhongthog Rinpoche, and Pewar Rinpoche rode on horses, wearing golden hats. This was the first time that Dagmo Kusho, the wife of Sakya Dagchen and niece of Dezhung Rinpoche, saw Dilgo Khyentse. She still remembers how she was immediately impressed by how tall he was and how he would follow Jamyang Khyentse everywhere, assisting him with everything he did. In the following months the three lamas, Khyentse Chökyi Lodrö, Dilgo Khyentse and Dezhung Rinpoche along with their families and attendants would spend many days at a mountain retreat discussing religious topics, having agreed not to engage in mundane talk.
Seventeen years after the passing of their teacher Jamyang Khyentse Chökyi Lodrö Kyabje Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche and HH Jigdral Dagchen Rinpoche met again when Khyentse Rinpoche visited Sakya Monastery in Seattle. The scholar Chris J. Wilkinson, an early student of Dezhung Rinpoche at the University of Washington, was there to take the photographs.
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And finally you may come across this photo:

Stefan Eckel, Volker Dencks, H.E. Dagmo Kusho-la and Nina de Eichas after a two hour interview at Sakya Monastery in September 2007.

Although it was late in the evening after a few hours of practice in the monastery, Dagmo-la had kindly agreed to sit for a third interview with us. While the previous two sessions had focused on recollections from her time at Dzongsar in 1954 and particularly her memories of Khyentse Sangyum Khandro Tsering Chödrön, this time we were asking about her experiences when coming to the West and the challenges she faced when raising her five children in this new environment, working full time while simultaneously attending two great lamas. We can read a lot about her childhood and early years in Tibet in the wonderful autobiography Princess in the Land of Snows, and I do hope that one day Dagmo-la will also share the very moving and inspiring stories from her 'second life' in a book.

(Linda Lane took the pictures and kindly drove Dagmo-la home that night)

1 comment:

  1. Volker, this is just a lovely and amazing article - thank you so much! Words are not enough.

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